Bronsted or Lewis Definition?

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Alan Wu
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Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:16 am

Bronsted or Lewis Definition?

Postby Alan Wu » Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:03 pm

For the upcoming final, which definition of acids and bases are we supposed to use by default?

Also, for Bronsted Bases, are we allowed to refer to NaOH (the entire compound) as a base? Or do we have to specifically point out that OH- is the Bronsted Base while Na+ is just a spectator ion?

Naneeta_Desar_1K
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Bronsted or Lewis Definition?

Postby Naneeta_Desar_1K » Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:47 pm

I believe for the final we will have to know both the bronsted and lewis definitions since we went over both in lecture.

Sharon Rodriguez 3H
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Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Bronsted or Lewis Definition?

Postby Sharon Rodriguez 3H » Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:52 pm

I would say that just to be safe, we should specifically point out that OH- is the Bronsted base and Na+ is a spectator ion.

John Arambulo 1I
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Bronsted or Lewis Definition?

Postby John Arambulo 1I » Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:53 pm

NaOH, the entire compound, is considered a base (a STRONG base, even). A bronsted base is defined as anything that accepts a proton.

Alan Wu
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Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Bronsted or Lewis Definition?

Postby Alan Wu » Sun Dec 01, 2019 12:47 am

John Arambulo 1I wrote:NaOH, the entire compound, is considered a base (a STRONG base, even). A bronsted base is defined as anything that accepts a proton.


But the textbook explicitly states that Na+ is the spectator ion and OH- alone is the Bronsted Base. It warns us to not confuse it with what you said about NaOH being a Bronsted Base as a whole. But then many chemists just generally refer to NaOH as a whole being the Bronsted Base.

John Arambulo 1I
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Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Bronsted or Lewis Definition?

Postby John Arambulo 1I » Sun Dec 01, 2019 12:52 am

Alan Wu wrote:
John Arambulo 1I wrote:NaOH, the entire compound, is considered a base (a STRONG base, even). A bronsted base is defined as anything that accepts a proton.


But the textbook explicitly states that Na+ is the spectator ion and OH- alone is the Bronsted Base. It warns us to not confuse it with what you said about NaOH being a Bronsted Base as a whole. But then many chemists just generally refer to NaOH as a whole being the Bronsted Base.


Read carefully please. I didn’t say that NaOH is a bronsted base as a whole, I said that that compound NaOH is a base.

Alan Wu
Posts: 61
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Bronsted or Lewis Definition?

Postby Alan Wu » Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:42 pm

John Arambulo 1I wrote:
Alan Wu wrote:
John Arambulo 1I wrote:NaOH, the entire compound, is considered a base (a STRONG base, even). A bronsted base is defined as anything that accepts a proton.


But the textbook explicitly states that Na+ is the spectator ion and OH- alone is the Bronsted Base. It warns us to not confuse it with what you said about NaOH being a Bronsted Base as a whole. But then many chemists just generally refer to NaOH as a whole being the Bronsted Base.


Read carefully please. I didn’t say that NaOH is a bronsted base as a whole, I said that that compound NaOH is a base.


That's literally the same thing...


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