HW 12.9.c is not a proton transfer?

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Yoon Lee 2A
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HW 12.9.c is not a proton transfer?

Postby Yoon Lee 2A » Sun Nov 29, 2015 11:04 pm

I need help putting to words why (c) CH3COOH(aq) + NH3(aq) -> CH3CONH2(aq) + H2O(l) is not considered a proton transfer? It doesn't "look" like it but I need help explaining. Thank you!

Chem_Mod
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Re: HW 12.9.c is not a proton transfer?

Postby Chem_Mod » Mon Nov 30, 2015 8:50 am

A proton transfer would result in a net ionic equation in which an H+ ion is transferred from one species to another. In this case, the reactants could undergo a proton transfer, but this would look like:

CH3COOH(aq) + NH3(aq) --> CH3COO-(aq) + NH4+(aq)

The way the reaction is written, however, there is no direct transfer of one proton from a species to another which is needed for Bronsted acid/base reactions.

Jacob Afable 3J
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Re: HW 12.9.c is not a proton transfer?

Postby Jacob Afable 3J » Tue Dec 01, 2015 12:25 am

Chem_Mod wrote:A proton transfer would result in a net ionic equation in which an H+ ion is transferred from one species to another. In this case, the reactants could undergo a proton transfer, but this would look like:

CH3COOH(aq) + NH3(aq) --> CH3COO-(aq) + NH4+(aq)

The way the reaction is written, however, there is no direct transfer of one proton from a species to another which is needed for Bronsted acid/base reactions.


For this question, I noticed that a proton (hydrogen atom) from NH3 was transferred to form H2O(l) along with a transfer of OH- from CH3COOH. If there are multiple protons transferred from one species to another along with a transfer of a single electron, is it safe to say that no proton transferred?


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