12.1

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Jacinda Wollenweber 1D
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:02 am

12.1

Postby Jacinda Wollenweber 1D » Sun Jul 30, 2017 11:37 pm

I am a bit confused about writing the formulas of conjugate bases, in terms of what happens to hydrogen. In part d) we are given HCO3-, but then when we write the conjugate the hydrogen disappears. Is it because it is being added to the other side, causing the charge to change to 2-?

Jacinda Wollenweber 1D
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:02 am

Re: 12.1

Postby Jacinda Wollenweber 1D » Sun Jul 30, 2017 11:40 pm

Also, in part f) CH3COOH, does the O2 in the answer represent the two O at. the end of the compound after hydrogen is removed? I hope my question makes sense lol

504754253
Posts: 45
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:39 am

Re: 12.1

Postby 504754253 » Sun Jul 30, 2017 11:42 pm

can someone explain the conjugate base.. is it just another way of saying weak? serious question

Liam Maxwell 2E
Posts: 53
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: 12.1

Postby Liam Maxwell 2E » Tue Dec 05, 2017 8:29 pm

I am confused about part b. It is asking for the conjugate acid of NH2NH2. Both nitrogens have a lone pair, so could the hydrogen from H2O attach to either one?

Jana Sun 1I
Posts: 52
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: 12.1

Postby Jana Sun 1I » Wed Dec 06, 2017 11:53 pm

Liam Maxwell 3F wrote:I am confused about part b. It is asking for the conjugate acid of NH2NH2. Both nitrogens have a lone pair, so could the hydrogen from H2O attach to either one?


Yes, you're right. The hydrogen could form on either nitrogen. NH2NH2 will only accept one hydrogen to create a conjugate acid and I'm not sure if it matters which nitrogen it attaches to.


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