HW 12.1

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MinyoungHong_1L
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Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

HW 12.1

Postby MinyoungHong_1L » Wed Jun 13, 2018 10:16 pm

Hi!

For acid and base reactions where the acid has multiple hydrogen atoms, how do we tell which hydrogen will be transferred in the reaction?

For example 12.1a : CH3NH2 has the conjugate acid CH3NH3+

Why does the H+ add to the NH instead of the CH? Is there a general rule governing this process?

Thank you!

Rogelio Bazan 1D
Posts: 64
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 3:01 am

Re: HW 12.1

Postby Rogelio Bazan 1D » Wed Jun 13, 2018 10:20 pm

Hello, I hope you are well, I think it has to do with the Brønsted-Lowry Definition of what an acid and what a base is that determines which one accepts the H+. Brønsted-Lowry Acid is a proton (hydrogen ion), donor. A Brønsted-Lowry base is a proton (hydrogen ion), acceptor. I hope this helps.

Andrew Evans - 1G
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Re: HW 12.1

Postby Andrew Evans - 1G » Wed Jun 13, 2018 10:21 pm

In this situation the C already has 4 bonds and wouldn't be able to accept another.

But more importantly this molecule is a base, which means it has a LONE PAIR that takes on the proton. N is the only atom with a lone pair so it has to be the one that takes on the H+ proton.

MinyoungHong_1L
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

Re: HW 12.1

Postby MinyoungHong_1L » Wed Jun 13, 2018 11:31 pm

Andrew Evans - 1G wrote:In this situation the C already has 4 bonds and wouldn't be able to accept another.

But more importantly this molecule is a base, which means it has a LONE PAIR that takes on the proton. N is the only atom with a lone pair so it has to be the one that takes on the H+ proton.


Ahhhh thank you very much!

MinyoungHong_1L
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

Re: HW 12.1

Postby MinyoungHong_1L » Wed Jun 13, 2018 11:31 pm

Rogelio Bazan 1J wrote:Hello, I hope you are well, I think it has to do with the Brønsted-Lowry Definition of what an acid and what a base is that determines which one accepts the H+. Brønsted-Lowry Acid is a proton (hydrogen ion), donor. A Brønsted-Lowry base is a proton (hydrogen ion), acceptor. I hope this helps.


Thank you for your help!

ChemSection3I
Posts: 9
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:05 am

Re: HW 12.1

Postby ChemSection3I » Wed Dec 05, 2018 4:52 pm

Andrew Evans - 1G wrote:In this situation the C already has 4 bonds and wouldn't be able to accept another.

But more importantly this molecule is a base, which means it has a LONE PAIR that takes on the proton. N is the only atom with a lone pair so it has to be the one that takes on the H+ proton.


was also wondering this, thanks for explaining!!


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