oxoacids

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Jasmine Holloway 1G
Posts: 39
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

oxoacids

Postby Jasmine Holloway 1G » Thu Dec 03, 2015 12:51 pm

I know that the more electron withdrawing atoms around a central atoms makes an acid stronger. This is why HClO2 is a stronger acid than HClO. I know that having more oxygens increases the oxidation state of Cl. Why would the increasing of the oxidation state of Cl increase the strength of the acid?

Also, I know that the more electron withdrawing atoms there are around an atom that, the negative charge on the conjugate base is more stabilized because the electron density is delocalized towards the electronegative atom. Why does that increase the strength of an acid?

Finally, in the book on page 483 under table 12.6 it says that the electron density is shifted away from the O-H bonds. Because the density is shifted away from the O-H bonds, does that mean that the H can be removed easier and and thats why the acid is stronger?

Are all of these three related?

Please help! Thanks in advanced.

Ronald Yang 2F
Posts: 86
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: oxoacids

Postby Ronald Yang 2F » Thu Dec 03, 2015 2:52 pm

Hey Jasmine! :)

Increasing the oxidation state means a higher oxidation number on that Cl, which gives Cl more of a positive charge on that atom. Since like charges repel, the more-positive Cl would repel H+ more easily, making the overall molecule a stronger acid with higher H+ donating properties.

More delocalization of electrons about the molecule means there are less electrons localized at the bonding area between H+ and the rest of the molecule. The bond is thus weaker between H+ and the rest of the molecule, making the overall molecule a stronger acid.

Yes, like I said above, that is why it's a stronger acid. Electron density shifted away from bonding area, so easier to remove that H+.

Hope that helps!


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