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What is kA value?

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:23 pm
by Amina Durrani 3G
What exactly does kA mean? I know its the equilibrium value, but when you calculate it, do you say that it is the amount of acid dissociated?

Re: What is kA value?

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:28 pm
by AVerma_F19
It basically gives you the ratio between the (product of the concentration of each of the products)/(product of the concentration of each of the reactants). Using this, you can calculate the concentration of the reactants or products using the kA given.

Re: What is kA value?

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:30 pm
by TarynD_1I
kA is the acid dissociation constant, and larger values for kA means that the acid is stronger and dissociates better, while smaller values for kA means that the acid is weaker and does not dissociate as well.

Re: What is kA value?

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:41 pm
by Nathan Nakaguchi 1G
kA is the ionization constant which lets you know how ionized/dissociated a solution is. The more ionized the stronger it is, the less ionized the weaker.

Re: What is kA value?

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 3:17 pm
by Aarushi Solanki 4F
The value of kA is the acid disassociation constant for a reaction at equilibrium. Essentially, this means that kA is the ratio of concentration of products (multiplied) to concentration of reactants (multiplied) when these values are in the equilibrium state.

Re: What is kA value?

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 6:53 pm
by MKearney_4G
k is calculated by [concentration of products multiplied together]/[concentration of reactants multiplied together] when the solution is at equilibrium. When the M of products is really high compared to the M of reactants, that means the reaction is carried out to near completion. For dissociation of acids, kA measures how much the acid dissociates and thus how strong it will be.

Strong acids do not generally have a written kA for these problems because it would be so insanely large that it's practically useless: just assume 100% dissociation.