Classifying Salts

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Haley Fredricks 1B
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Classifying Salts

Postby Haley Fredricks 1B » Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:06 pm

When you're given a salt (ex: BaCl) in water, how can you tell if it will act as an acid or base in solution?

WUng_1D
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Classifying Salts

Postby WUng_1D » Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:15 pm

I think it depends on the reaction because we can tell something is an acid if they are a proton donor while a base is a proton acceptor. Knowing this you would have to see whether the salt is giving away its proton or accepting it.

Sukanya Mohapatra 2G
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Re: Classifying Salts

Postby Sukanya Mohapatra 2G » Tue Dec 03, 2019 10:52 pm

You can do so by writing out the reaction for the salt and analyzing the products.

sarahsalama2E
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Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Classifying Salts

Postby sarahsalama2E » Tue Dec 03, 2019 10:57 pm

Seeing if OH- or H+ ion is produced is a way to see if the salt given will act as an acid or a base in water. You must write out the reaction in order to see this.

Montana James 4G
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Re: Classifying Salts

Postby Montana James 4G » Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:46 pm

follow up question: wouldn't BaCl be one of the salts that doesn't affect pH because Ba+ is in group 2?

WesleyWu_1C
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Re: Classifying Salts

Postby WesleyWu_1C » Wed Dec 04, 2019 1:44 am

You have to look at the cation and anion of the salt and determine if they are stable as cations and anions. If they are not stable as cations and anions, then they will probably affect the pH.

Yes, BaCl would not affect the pH because Ba+ is in group 2 and because Cl- is a stable anion.


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