Heat of Fusion Title

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Aleck Sun 1J
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Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Heat of Fusion Title

Postby Aleck Sun 1J » Tue Jan 19, 2016 4:07 pm

I don't quite understand why the term "heat of fusion" is used to describe the heat required to undergo a phase change from solid to liquid. I'm fairly sure that fusion means to combine different substances to form one. However, the heat of fusion is like the amount of heat required to separate the molecules to undergo its next phase change, which is contradictory to the word fusion. Could someone explain the reasoning behind the name "heat of fusion"?

Joshua Kim 3H
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Heat of Fusion Title

Postby Joshua Kim 3H » Tue Jan 19, 2016 4:21 pm

On page 17 of the Course Reader it says Melting (Fusion): Solid --> Liquid. So from solid ice to liquid water, the term fusion is used. There's a phase change from solid to liquid hence the flat line on a heat curve.

Daniella Ching 4C
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Heat of Fusion Title

Postby Daniella Ching 4C » Wed Jan 20, 2016 11:10 pm

The definition of solid becoming liquid as fusion confused me too, since I thought of it the same way, as two objects becoming one. But often, fusion requires heat. I found this other definition online: "The noun fusion comes from the Latin word fundere, meaning melt, so fusion is the act of melting things together." This definitely makes more sense in terms of why fusion is used to describe the phase change from solid to liquid, as the solid is being melted, through the application of heat, into a liquid.


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