Open, Closed, and Isolated Systems

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Alyssa_Wieand_2G
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:58 pm

Open, Closed, and Isolated Systems

Postby Alyssa_Wieand_2G » Sun Jan 22, 2017 10:17 pm

Hi, can someone please go more in depth on the differences between each kind of system and give some examples?

Sophie_Ahmad_2F
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:57 pm

Re: Open, Closed, and Isolated Systems

Postby Sophie_Ahmad_2F » Sun Jan 22, 2017 10:20 pm

An open system can exchange matter and energy with its surroundings and an example of this is the human body. A closed system has a set amount of matter but can exchange energy with the surroundings. An example of a closed system is an ice pack used to treat athletic injuries. An isolated system has no contact with its surroundings. For example, a system sealed inside rigid, thermally insulating walls such as hot liquid in a thermos. Hope that helps!

Catherine_Zhang_1H
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Open, Closed, and Isolated Systems

Postby Catherine_Zhang_1H » Mon Jan 23, 2017 12:53 am

Additional question, what type if system is a constant pressure calorimeter?

Jose_Arambulo_2I
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:59 pm

Re: Open, Closed, and Isolated Systems

Postby Jose_Arambulo_2I » Mon Jan 23, 2017 1:47 am

I think a constant pressure calorimeter would be an example of an open system because the volume can change. (Open system=stuff can be added or removed from system). It shouldn't be a closed system because volume shouldn't change, and it definitely cannot be isolated.

Ashley_Thomas_3C
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

Re: Open, Closed, and Isolated Systems

Postby Ashley_Thomas_3C » Mon Jan 23, 2017 2:02 am

I think a constant pressure calorimeter is an isolated system because in order to measure the heat of a reaction, the reaction must be isolated so that no heat is lost to the environment. This is achieved by use of a calorimeter, which insulates the reaction to better contain heat. Coffee cups are often used as a quick and easy to make calorimeter for constant pressure.

Catherine_Zhang_1H
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Open, Closed, and Isolated Systems

Postby Catherine_Zhang_1H » Sun Jan 29, 2017 6:22 pm

What about bomb calorimeters? (Mentioned in 8.1) What are they and why are they isolated systems?

Jerry_Dar_3C
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

Re: Open, Closed, and Isolated Systems

Postby Jerry_Dar_3C » Sun Jan 29, 2017 9:57 pm

If I understand correctly, a bomb calorimeter is a device used to calculate specific heat under the circumstances of constant volume. It does not allow the transfer of heat or matter, therefore, it is an isolated system.

Kaitlin_Ryan_ 3K
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Open, Closed, and Isolated Systems

Postby Kaitlin_Ryan_ 3K » Sat Feb 11, 2017 11:23 am

Isolated systems do not allow any transfer of heat or matter. A bomb calorimeter is considered an isolated system because it prevents any heat from the reaction inside from escaping to the surroundings, and is closed so that no matter from the surroundings can enter or leave the system.

Matt Goff 1F
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Open, Closed, and Isolated Systems

Postby Matt Goff 1F » Sat Feb 11, 2017 1:52 pm

A constant pressure calorimeter gives enthalpy values (as the definition of enthalpy is heat at constant pressure).
A constant volume calorimeter is a bomb calorimeter. You can remember this because as the volume stays constant and a reaction (igniting oxygen) takes place, the pressure increases inside this volume and can explode.

The bomb calorimeter is an isolated system.


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