Ideal Gas

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donnanguyen1d
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Ideal Gas

Postby donnanguyen1d » Thu Jan 11, 2018 3:01 pm

What does it mean when something behaves as an ideal gas? why is that significant for problem 8.31?

Kailey Brodeur 1J
Posts: 34
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Ideal Gas

Postby Kailey Brodeur 1J » Thu Jan 11, 2018 3:18 pm

An ideal gas is a hypothetical gas who obeys all the gas laws exactly because it is seen to occupy negligible space and has no interactions with other molecules. I think that this is important for question 31 because it allows you to apply all gas laws and their corresponding equations.

Max Mazo 2C
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Re: Ideal Gas

Postby Max Mazo 2C » Thu Jan 11, 2018 3:20 pm

If something behaves like an ideal gas, it means it follows the ideal gas law PV=nRT.

Jimmy Zhang Dis 1K
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:05 am

Re: Ideal Gas

Postby Jimmy Zhang Dis 1K » Thu Jan 11, 2018 10:46 pm

As mentioned above an ideal gas is a hypothetical version of a gas whose molecules do not repel/attract eachother and also take up no volume. This allows you to apply equations like PV=nRT to solve problems. In the real world it is unlikely that any gases follow this law.

Meredith Steinberg 2E
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Ideal Gas

Postby Meredith Steinberg 2E » Fri Jan 12, 2018 11:26 am

An ideal gas means the gas follows the properties of gases "ideally." For example, an ideal gas contains random particle motion, and each particle collision is completely elastic (no energy is lost during the collision). An ideal gas follows the ideal gas law PV=nRT.

David Zhou 1L
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: Ideal Gas

Postby David Zhou 1L » Fri Jan 12, 2018 9:53 pm

No gas behaves completely like an ideal gas; however, in many situations, especially those with relatively low pressure and small gas particles, gases behave close enough to ideal gas behavior that the ideal gas law is a very good approximation for the situation.


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