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Intensive vs. Extensive

Posted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 11:17 am
by RussellChin_3A
Can someone explain to me the difference between intensive and extensive variables, and when we should apply this to our thermochemistry/dynamics calculations?

Re: Intensive vs. Extensive

Posted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 11:18 am
by Scott Chin_1E
Intensive Properties refers to properties that do not depend on the size or amount of the substance while Extensive Properties do. For example mass and volume are extensive properties while density is not

Re: Intensive vs. Extensive

Posted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 11:37 am
by Merzia Subhan 1L
Heat capacity is an extensive property because, as it is the heat required to raise the temperature of an object by 1 deg. C, it is dependent on the amount of the object--kJ/deg. C. To get it to be an intensive property, you would divide the heat capacity by the amount of substance present.This is called specific heat capacity --kJ/(deg. C * g)

Re: Intensive vs. Extensive

Posted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 1:31 pm
by Nicole Anisgard Parra 2H
Extensive variables depend on how much there is of something (such as mass, volume, etc), while intensive variables don't rely on the quantity of the material/substance/element/object present (density will always be the same in an object regardless of how much there is of it, for example). In regards to how it relates to our current unit, extensive properties generally aren't useful to us because they tell us information about a certain quantity of an object, which isn't very useful when you are trying to find a property that applies to every single instance of the substance. This is why we prefer intensive properties; once they are calculated, we know they apply to every single other example that might be shown of that material/substance.

Re: Intensive vs. Extensive

Posted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 2:27 pm
by Timothy Kim 1B
An extensive property is dependent on the amount of a substance.
We get an intensive property when we divide heat capacity by the amount of substance present.
We use extensive and intensive properties when dealing with specific heat capacities.