Page 1 of 1

Sublimation

Posted: Fri Jan 25, 2019 5:57 pm
by Michelle Fu 1H
Last unit we talked about how increasing pressure would push the equilibrium towards the side with less moles or more compact molecules, thus creating more solids in some cases. I was wondering in cases which two gases go straight to a solid how it bypasses the step of turning into a liquid, like water does.

Re: Sublimation

Posted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 2:24 pm
by Aurbal Popal
Increasing pressure would push the equilibrium towards the side with less gaseous moles. It does not apply to solids or liquids.

Re: Sublimation

Posted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 3:06 pm
by Noah Fox 1E
I suppose it would be able to bypass the step of turning into a liquid because of incredibly strong intermolecular forces, however I do not know if this would create solid materials or incredibly viscous non-newtonian-like fluids

Re: Sublimation

Posted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 3:50 pm
by Henry Dudley 1G
Yeah how do compounds like CO2 in the form of dry ice go straight from being a solid to a liquid? Does CO2 even have a liquid state, and if not, how is that possible?

Re: Sublimation

Posted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 4:23 pm
by Schuyler_Howell_4D
In response to the question about dry ice, it is special in the way that carbon in the form of dry ice goes directly to a gas phase and doesn't become a liquid. Sublimation occurs because the phase change happens at temperatures and pressures that can't allow the compound to be liquid. It requires a lot of energy in the form of heat to skip the liquid phase.

Re: Sublimation

Posted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 7:17 pm
by Porus_Karwa_2E
This does not effect solids or liquids

Re: Sublimation

Posted: Sun Jan 27, 2019 1:40 pm
by Theodore_Herring_1A
It will bypass the liquid state if there is not enough pressure for the compound to form a liquid state, and thus will skip directly to the gas phase. For there to be a liquid state, the pressure would have to be very high.