Steam

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pamcoronel1H
Posts: 45
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Steam

Postby pamcoronel1H » Sun Jan 27, 2019 10:16 pm

Just to clarify, was the reason why steam causes severe burns was because as vapor turns to liquid it releases more a lot of heat (40.7 kJ). Or is there more detail behind this?

705192887
Posts: 77
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Steam

Postby 705192887 » Sun Jan 27, 2019 10:23 pm

Yes. Steam has more energy so it causes more severe burns.

Alma Flores 1D
Posts: 64
Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2017 3:01 am

Re: Steam

Postby Alma Flores 1D » Sun Jan 27, 2019 11:14 pm

Yes, steam causes more severe burns because it has more energy, with a temperature of 40.7 kJ/mol, as opposed to liquid which has a temperature of 7.5 kJ/mol. This is demonstrated using the heating curve for water.

Chris Dis3L
Posts: 45
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Steam

Postby Chris Dis3L » Sun Jan 27, 2019 11:57 pm

When boiling water comes into contact with your skin, it will transfer the difference in heat to your skin which results in a burn. However, when steam touches your skin it not only transfers the difference in heat similar to boiling water, but it also transfers the energy from the latent heat
of vaporization. Thus steam causes more severe burns than boiling water.

Jonny Schindler 1A
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:20 am

Re: Steam

Postby Jonny Schindler 1A » Mon Jan 28, 2019 11:15 am

Is this also true for the small amounts of steam that escape even before the boiling point is reached?

Fanny Lee 2K
Posts: 73
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: Steam

Postby Fanny Lee 2K » Mon Jan 28, 2019 2:44 pm

When steam gets into contact with the air, doesn't it cool down immediately?

Angela Cong 3C
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Steam

Postby Angela Cong 3C » Mon Jan 28, 2019 10:23 pm

steam does cool down but it's still immediately displacing the energy that was necessary to change water into steam in the heating curve.

lindsey_ammann_4E
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: Steam

Postby lindsey_ammann_4E » Tue Jan 29, 2019 9:37 am

To answer this question, you must refer to the heating curve. In this case, steam has more energy in Kj/mol, meaning it will burn your hand more upon contact due to the higher amount of energy of vaporized water (compared to the lower amount of energy in liquid water).

Megan_Ervin_1F
Posts: 78
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Steam

Postby Megan_Ervin_1F » Wed Jan 30, 2019 1:29 pm

It is because there is more energy released for a gas than a liquid. The reason it burns so much is because the energy is released very quickly. For example, my TA explained it like if you were to punch someone slowly it would not hurt as much but if you punch someone quickly the pain is greater. Similar thinking for how gas releases more energy very quickly.

Brandon Mo 4K
Posts: 70
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: Steam

Postby Brandon Mo 4K » Fri Feb 01, 2019 1:49 am

Steam causes severe burns because it releases a lot of energy very quickly when it turns back into liquid water.

Ray Huang 1G
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:20 am

Re: Steam

Postby Ray Huang 1G » Fri Feb 01, 2019 8:57 am

Steam is worse bc it can carry more energy for the same temperature compared to liquid water.

005113695
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: Steam

Postby 005113695 » Sat Feb 02, 2019 1:54 pm

steam causes more severe burns because steam has more energy if you look at its heating curve.


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