Isothermic vs. Adiabatic

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bonnie_schmitz_1F
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Isothermic vs. Adiabatic

Postby bonnie_schmitz_1F » Wed Mar 13, 2019 8:04 pm

In the review session tonight, the TA used the word adiabatic to describe a reaction in which we knew q=0 because it was "adiabatic." Does adiabatic mean the same thing as isothermic?

Gary Qiao 1D
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: Isothermic vs. Adiabatic

Postby Gary Qiao 1D » Wed Mar 13, 2019 8:12 pm

I think adiabatic means something has no heat transfer while isothermic means that there is no change in temperature, but in the overall scheme of things they both refer to q=0.

Tameen Ahmed 4C
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: Isothermic vs. Adiabatic

Postby Tameen Ahmed 4C » Wed Mar 13, 2019 8:31 pm

In an adiabatic system, there is no heat transferred; therefore, the total change in internal energy of the system is equal to the work performed (deltaU=w). In an isothermal system, there's no change in temperature; therefore, the total internal energy of the system doesn't change (deltaU=0). Because of this, the heat transferred is equivalent in value to the work performed (q=-w) for isothermal.

Roberto Gonzalez 1L
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: Isothermic vs. Adiabatic

Postby Roberto Gonzalez 1L » Sun Mar 17, 2019 5:18 pm

They pertain to solving for change in U, as in Isothermic conditions there is no change in temp. but work is done equivalent to -q which is the change in U. For adiabatic conditions there is no heat transferred. Basically under both conditions keep in mind that q=0.


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