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Specific heat capacity of ice

Posted: Fri Mar 15, 2019 9:09 pm
by Clarissa Cabil 1I
When calculating q of ice combining with water, I know you would use the equation q = mCΔT + nΔHfus.
For C or specific heat, do I use the specific heat of water or ice? Why?

Re: Specific heat capacity of ice

Posted: Fri Mar 15, 2019 9:40 pm
by skyeblee2F
Think of it as two reactions occurring, where the ice (gains heat and) is undergoing a phase change to water and water (loses heat and) is undergoing a phase change to water. Thus you would have two identical equations equal to each other except for the specific heat and enthalpies.

ice: q(gain) = mC(solid)ΔT + nΔH(fus)
water: q(loss) = mC(liquid)ΔT + nΔH(freezing)

note that q(loss)=q(gain)
thus: mC(solid)ΔT + nΔH(fus) = mC(liquid)ΔT + nΔH(freezing)

Re: Specific heat capacity of ice

Posted: Sat Mar 16, 2019 10:12 pm
by eden tefera 2B
Since each of them have their own phase change, you use that phase's specific heat capacity.