Change in Temperature

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Michelle N - 2C
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Change in Temperature

Postby Michelle N - 2C » Tue Jan 28, 2020 10:47 am

So I’m starting to understand a little bit better about endothermic and exothermic reactions, but I wanted a little clarification here? As temperature increases, so does the equilibrium constant? Sorry, just wanted to have a clear understanding if anything.

Michael Nguyen 1E
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Re: Change in Temperature

Postby Michael Nguyen 1E » Tue Jan 28, 2020 10:58 am

Yes, that's correct. When the temperature of a system changes, its equilibrium constant will also change.

Jessica Esparza 2H
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Re: Change in Temperature

Postby Jessica Esparza 2H » Tue Jan 28, 2020 11:18 am

The equilibrium constant will only rise if your reaction is endothermic and you add heat. If you add heat and it's exothermic the equilibrium constant will decrease (this is because your reverse reaction is endothermic and so adding heat will cause a reaction to proceed in reverse direction.

Katie Bart 1I
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Re: Change in Temperature

Postby Katie Bart 1I » Tue Jan 28, 2020 11:51 am

Also, a change in temperature is the only factor that will change the K value for a reaction.

Jaci Glassick 2G
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Re: Change in Temperature

Postby Jaci Glassick 2G » Tue Jan 28, 2020 12:15 pm

The equilibrium constant will change with temperature. If the reaction is exothermic (releases heat), your constant will decrease. If the reaction is endothermic (absorbs heat), your constant will increase.

Jialun Chen 4F
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Re: Change in Temperature

Postby Jialun Chen 4F » Tue Jan 28, 2020 1:07 pm

Correct! Equilibrium constants change as the alteration of the temperature inside the system occurs.

Trent Yamamoto 2J
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Re: Change in Temperature

Postby Trent Yamamoto 2J » Tue Jan 28, 2020 1:54 pm

Temperature is the only condition that will alter the K value. In an exothermic reaction, where heat is released, your constant will decrease. If the reaction is endothermic, where heat is absorbed, your constant will increase.

Oduwole 1E
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Joined: Fri Aug 02, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Change in Temperature

Postby Oduwole 1E » Tue Jan 28, 2020 2:01 pm

Michelle N - 2C wrote:So I’m starting to understand a little bit better about endothermic and exothermic reactions, but I wanted a little clarification here? As temperature increases, so does the equilibrium constant? Sorry, just wanted to have a clear understanding if anything.


Yeah, as temperature increases, so will the equilibrium constant.

105335337
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Change in Temperature

Postby 105335337 » Tue Jan 28, 2020 2:27 pm

Yes, temperature is a factor that changes the equilibrium constant. For example, if temperature increases in a reaction, the equilibrium constant will change.

Vicki Liu 2L
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Change in Temperature

Postby Vicki Liu 2L » Tue Jan 28, 2020 2:39 pm

To figure out the reasoning behind the change in equilibrium constant, figure out if heat is a product (exothermic reaction) or a reactant (endothermic reaction). When heat is added, the reaction will shift towards the opposite side. Then, based on whether the reactant or product side is favored, you can determine whether the equilibrium constant increases or decreases.

Luc Zelissen 1K
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Re: Change in Temperature

Postby Luc Zelissen 1K » Tue Jan 28, 2020 8:04 pm

You can think of this in another way: imagine putting heat as a reactant or product based on if the reaction is endothermic or exothermic. Then you can use le chatelier's principle to determine how K will change. For an exothermic reaction, the heat is on the products side because it is released. If you add heat you will then in turn favor the reverse reaction, lowering K and on the flip side, if you decrease heat the reaction will favor the products side and K will increase. If the reaction is endothermic then the heat sits on the reactant side. If you increase heat you will favor the forward reaction, increasing K, and if you lower heat then you favor the reverse reaction, lowering K.


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