delta G0 versus delta G

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Parker Smith
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delta G0 versus delta G

Postby Parker Smith » Mon Feb 17, 2020 8:56 am

What Is the difference between delta G0 and delta G, and why are they both in the delta G= delta GO+RTln(K equation?

madawy
Posts: 81
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Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby madawy » Mon Feb 17, 2020 9:35 am

The difference between the two is that delta G naught is at standard conditions. The reason Professor Lavelle emphasized it is because delta G naught is always the same because it is referring to when the reactants/products are at standard temperature/pressure. As the rxn goes towards equilibrium, delta G (without the naught) changes because the rxn is proceeding. So as the chemical rxn approaches equilibrium, delta G (without the naught) approaches zero. Delta G naught remains the same because it is still referring to when the rxn is at standard conditions (:

Tyler Angtuaco 1G
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Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby Tyler Angtuaco 1G » Sat Feb 22, 2020 11:56 am

Delta G naught is an intensive property (values are calculated at standard conditions), whereas delta G isn't. Using delta G naught helps observe a reaction in unstandard conditions.

Madeline Phan 1E
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Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby Madeline Phan 1E » Sat Feb 22, 2020 12:02 pm

Delta G0 is at standard conditions, while delta G is the G value of the reaction at any point in time.

Joseph Saba
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Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby Joseph Saba » Sat Feb 22, 2020 12:04 pm

madawy wrote:The difference between the two is that delta G naught is at standard conditions. The reason Professor Lavelle emphasized it is because delta G naught is always the same because it is referring to when the reactants/products are at standard temperature/pressure. As the rxn goes towards equilibrium, delta G (without the naught) changes because the rxn is proceeding. So as the chemical rxn approaches equilibrium, delta G (without the naught) approaches zero. Delta G naught remains the same because it is still referring to when the rxn is at standard conditions (:

Does Delta G (without the naught) change with concentration? And the "standard conditions" you reference are for the concentrations to be 1M?

Zoe Gleason 4F
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Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby Zoe Gleason 4F » Sat Feb 22, 2020 1:34 pm

Delta G naught (and any other thing with this symbol) shows free energy at standard conditions, while delta G will be at given conditions.

Megan Cao 1I
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Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby Megan Cao 1I » Sat Feb 22, 2020 1:58 pm

ΔG° is for the standard conditions.
ΔG is for the given conditions.

analogous to this is Q and K for equilibrium.
K is for the reaction at equilibrium and Q is the "temporary K" for the given conditions of the reaction.

AronCainBayot2K
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Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby AronCainBayot2K » Sat Feb 22, 2020 2:00 pm

Delta G will always be in the conditions given in the problem where as Delta G naught is in standard conditions.

Shivam Rana 1D
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Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby Shivam Rana 1D » Sat Feb 22, 2020 2:00 pm

Delta G0 is given under standard conditions whereas delta G is given for modified conditions.

WGaines_2E
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Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby WGaines_2E » Tue Mar 10, 2020 8:27 pm

G0 is at standard conditions (25 degrees C and 1 bar) whereas G can be calculated at conditions are than the ones I just listed.

Callum Guo 1H
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Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby Callum Guo 1H » Tue Mar 10, 2020 8:40 pm

Delta G0 is at standard conditions while delta G can be at any

Nicholas_Gladkov_2J
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Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby Nicholas_Gladkov_2J » Tue Mar 10, 2020 9:38 pm

Parker Smith wrote:What Is the difference between delta G0 and delta G, and why are they both in the delta G= delta GO+RTln(K equation?


Whenever anything has that tiny "o" (delta Go, Eo, So, Ho, etc) that just means standard conditions: 25C, 1bar/1atm, 1M.
It is pronounced "naught".

Astrid Lunde 1I
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Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby Astrid Lunde 1I » Tue Mar 10, 2020 9:58 pm

Anything with a o means that it is standard. So o is standard and is regular.

William Chan 1D
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Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:15 am

Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby William Chan 1D » Wed Mar 11, 2020 10:19 pm

The "°" in the equation refers to standard conditions. This means 25°C, 1 atm, 1M. If it isn't present, then the property may not be at standard conditions.

ValerieChavarin 4F
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Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby ValerieChavarin 4F » Thu Mar 12, 2020 7:03 am

The "o" indicates standard conditions, (in temperature, pressure and concentration. ∆G° can be used to find ∆G and vice versa in the equation ∆G = ∆G° + RT ln Q

Anish Natarajan 4G
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: delta G0 versus delta G

Postby Anish Natarajan 4G » Thu Mar 12, 2020 4:24 pm

Delta G0 is the Gibbs free energy of a reaction at equilibrium whereas delta G is the gibbs free energy of a reaction at any given state


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