Measuring Heat Transfer (extensive vs intensive)

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Caitlin Dillon 3G
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Measuring Heat Transfer (extensive vs intensive)

Postby Caitlin Dillon 3G » Sat Jan 14, 2017 1:09 pm

In lecture on Friday, I was confused about the difference between extensive property and intensive property. Can someone please elaborate?

Miya McLaughlin 2B
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:57 pm
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Re: Measuring Heat Transfer (extensive vs intensive)

Postby Miya McLaughlin 2B » Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:07 pm

Extensive Properties are physical properties that depend on the size of the sample you are using.
Intensive Properties are physical properties that DO NOT depend on the size of the sample.

Example: Say you have a sample of water. The volume(a physical property) of that sample will be dependent on how much water you actually have. 10 grams of water will have a very different volume than 100 grams. Therefore volume is an extensive property.

Density on the other hand, will be the same whether you have 10 grams or 100 grams. The density of water will always be 1g/cm3. The physical property of density isn't affected by the amount of water present. Therefore density is an intensive property.

I hope this was helpful.

Arshia_Sabir_3E
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:59 pm

Re: Measuring Heat Transfer (extensive vs intensive)

Postby Arshia_Sabir_3E » Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:10 pm

I know that both Intensive properties and extensive properties are types of physical properties. The main difference is that extensive properties depends on the matter present, for example, heat capacity is an extensive property because the heat required depends on the amount of substance present. Therefore, extensive properties are not very useful either because they can change according to the sample's size, mass, volume, etc. Intensive properties, on the other hand, do not change regardless of the amount of matter present. Intensive properties are useful since they can identify a sample's melting point, boiling point, density, color, odor, etc (these characteristics do not depend on the amount of sample) I hope this makes sense.


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