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Equation for a non-state property?

Posted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:12 pm
by Wilson Yeh 1L
So I know that a state property is not dependent on path taken, but rather just final - initial. However, for a non-state property like work and heat, what would be the equation to solve for it?

Re: Equation for a non-state property?

Posted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:14 pm
by Anna Okabe
In a sense it is like finding the total distance traveled by a particle. You add up all the distances (changes) it undergoes and add them together, disregarding negatives.

Re: Equation for a non-state property?

Posted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:03 pm
by Mia Navarro 1D
The sum of the two non-state properties, work and heat, creates an equation that is a state property. Each of the two is dependent on the process of achieving the final from the initial, making the result not constant.

Re: Equation for a non-state property?

Posted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 12:29 am
by Beza Ayalew 1I
I think Wilson Yeh wants to know of there is a standard equation that can be applied to situations involving heat or other not state properties that we will have to know? or is the value subjective depending on the situation?

Re: Equation for a non-state property?

Posted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 2:16 am
by Kyle Sheu 1C
For expansion work under constant external pressure, you can use the eq. w = -Pexternal * deltaV to calculate the work done by the system. There's also a table somewhere in the beginning of Chapter 8, which if I remember correctly, lists various types of work.

As for heat, when pressure is constant, q = delta H