Heat and Ethalpy

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Mary Becerra 2D
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Heat and Ethalpy

Postby Mary Becerra 2D » Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:15 pm

What is the difference between heat and enthalpy? From my understanding, enthalpy is the measurement of the change of heat after a reaction. Is this correct, wrong, or correct but too simplistic?

John Huang 1G
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Re: Heat and Ethalpy

Postby John Huang 1G » Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:27 pm

In thermodynamics, heat is the energy transferred as a result of temperature differences.

Enthalpy is the amount of heat released or absorbed at a constant pressure. Enthaply has to be measured at a constant pressure. If heat was being transferred under conditions of varying pressures, then we would not consider it enthalpy.

Hopefully this clears up your confusion.

Sophia Kim 1C
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Re: Heat and Ethalpy

Postby Sophia Kim 1C » Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:48 pm

I think that heat is the energy transferred in thermal reactions while enthalpy is the total energy in a thermodynamic system.

PeterTran1C
Posts: 30
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Heat and Ethalpy

Postby PeterTran1C » Sat Jan 13, 2018 9:04 pm

In addition:
Heat is defined as q, which more specifically means the quantity of heat.
While Enthalpy is defined as H or delta H


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