Standard States

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Cristian Carrasco 1F
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Standard States

Postby Cristian Carrasco 1F » Sun Jan 14, 2018 10:31 pm

How do you know if an element is in its standard state ?

sofiakavanaugh
Posts: 58
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am
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Re: Standard States

Postby sofiakavanaugh » Sun Jan 14, 2018 10:42 pm

The standard state of something is the state it is in at 1 atm and 25 degrees C. So if the temp is 25 degrees and the pressure is 1 atm and the substance is a liquid, than liquid would be its standard state, for example.

Katelyn 2E
Posts: 35
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:01 am

Re: Standard States

Postby Katelyn 2E » Sun Jan 14, 2018 10:46 pm

A standard state of a substance is its phase (the most stable one) at 1 atm and 25°C. Liquid is the standard state for mercury and bromine. Gas is the standard state for noble gases, halogens, fluorine, chlorine, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen, while all other elements are solid in their standard states.

SPandya1F
Posts: 51
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am
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Re: Standard States

Postby SPandya1F » Sun Jan 14, 2018 11:12 pm

The standard state of an element is stated on the periodic table.
Liquid is the standard state for bromine and mercury. Gas is the standard state for the noble gases, hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, and chlorine. Solid is the standard state for all other elements.


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