Most Stable Form

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Ava Harvey 2B
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Most Stable Form

Postby Ava Harvey 2B » Thu Jan 18, 2018 5:41 pm

I was just wondering, but are there any patterns or is there an easy way to figure out what the most stable form is for each element? I know that the standard enthalpy of formation of an element in its most stable form is zero, but what if you're not sure what the most stable form is? Thanks so much!

Sarah_Stay_1D
Posts: 57
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Most Stable Form

Postby Sarah_Stay_1D » Thu Jan 18, 2018 5:50 pm

Ava Harvey 2B wrote:I was just wondering, but are there any patterns or is there an easy way to figure out what the most stable form is for each element? I know that the standard enthalpy of formation of an element in its most stable form is zero, but what if you're not sure what the most stable form is? Thanks so much!


You would only have to memorize the stable forms for a few common elements. Most of the elements in the top right of the periodic table are diatomic gases in their most stable form (such as O2, H2, N2, and Cl2). However, bromine in its most stable form is Br2 (liquid), Carbon is graphite, and iodine is I2 (solid). Other than common elements such as these you would be given the standard states of elements on a test. Also, (you probably know this from intuition) but transition metals are almost always solids in their standard state.

Guadalupe T 1E
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: Most Stable Form

Postby Guadalupe T 1E » Thu Jan 18, 2018 5:59 pm

I was told we should know that Br2, and Hg are liquid, H2, N2, O2, F2, I2, and Cl2 are gases and their standard enthalpy of formation is 0. Besides the ones I named, any other ones should be given to us.

Mitch Walters
Posts: 45
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: Most Stable Form

Postby Mitch Walters » Thu Jan 18, 2018 6:02 pm

I always think of things in terms of potential energy. Whatever formation has the lowest potential energy should be the most stable.


Return to “Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests