steam vs. water

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josephyim1L
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

steam vs. water

Postby josephyim1L » Thu Jan 31, 2019 1:17 pm

Can someone explain why burns from steam cause more damage than burns from hot water?

Kobe_Wright
Posts: 83
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: steam vs. water

Postby Kobe_Wright » Thu Jan 31, 2019 1:27 pm

Steam is hotter water, so hot it turned into a different phase state.

Cynthia Aragon 1B
Posts: 47
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2018 1:38 pm

Re: steam vs. water

Postby Cynthia Aragon 1B » Thu Jan 31, 2019 1:52 pm

Burns from steam cause more damage than hot water due to the latent heat of vaporization which is the amount of heat energy required to change a unit of mass liquid into vapor at atmospheric pressure at its boiling point. In other words, it is the amount of heat energy required to change the state of matter from liquid to gas. This energy is absorbed by the liquid, but does not change the temperature. Boiling water only contains specific amount of heat energy required for it to boil. However as steam is formed from boiling water, it contains the heat energy of boiling water along with the latent heat of vaporization. Thus as steam has more heat energy it can cause severe burns than boiling water.

megan blatt 2B
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: steam vs. water

Postby megan blatt 2B » Thu Jan 31, 2019 3:19 pm

The reason why steam causes worse burns than water is more easily understood while looking at the heating curve of water. Even if steam and liquid water are both at 100 degrees celsius, the steam contains more Jules of heat energy than liquid water. This is because it includes all the heat energy required to raise the temperature of liquid water to 100 degrees celsius plus the amount of heat energy required for the water to vaporize from liquid water to steam. After liquid water hits 100 degrees celsius, any added heat energy is no longer being used to increase the temperature of the water, but is being used to break bonds between the liquid water molecules so that they are vaporized into steam. On the heating curve of water, the long horizontal line between liquid and vaporized water is a representation of the heat energy being added to the liquid water but not increasing the temperature because it is being used to break bonds.

tierra parker 1J
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: steam vs. water

Postby tierra parker 1J » Thu Jan 31, 2019 6:09 pm

https://courses.lumenlearning.com/intro ... for-water/

i couldn't figure out how to insert a picture of the heating curve so here's a website.
this is for reference of the answer above mine.

805087225
Posts: 30
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2018 3:00 am

Re: steam vs. water

Postby 805087225 » Thu Jan 31, 2019 6:19 pm

It is because, although the temperature of steam is 100 degree Celsius as well, it contains more heat that is used up to change the phase from water to steam. And this heat is also instrumental in burns, and is clearly missing in just water at 100 degree Celsius.
Thus, steam causes more of a burn than water at the same temperature ( 100 degree Celsius).


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