state property

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Marni Kahn 1A
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state property

Postby Marni Kahn 1A » Wed Jan 22, 2020 2:12 pm

why is enthalpy a state property?

AArmellini_1I
Posts: 107
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:15 am

Re: state property

Postby AArmellini_1I » Wed Jan 22, 2020 3:01 pm

Because the total enthalpy you end with is not dependent on the process you took to get to that point (like if I boil a pot of water and tell you it initially was 80 degrees and now its 150 degrees. You would tell me the temperature increased by 70 degrees, you wouldn't need to know how long I boiled the water or anything like that to determine the temperature). An example of a non-state variable would be something like calories burned on a hike, you would not only need to know where a person begun and finished a hike, but also the path and the way the moved in order to calculate the total calories burned.

Maya Pakulski 1D
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Re: state property

Postby Maya Pakulski 1D » Thu Jan 23, 2020 5:13 pm

What are others examples of things that could be state properties?

Michael Nguyen 1E
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: state property

Postby Michael Nguyen 1E » Thu Jan 23, 2020 5:16 pm

Other examples of state properties include energy, pressure, volume, temperature, density, and heat capacity.

805307623
Posts: 99
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:17 am

Re: state property

Postby 805307623 » Fri Jan 24, 2020 2:26 pm

Enthalpy is considered a state function because it only depends on two thermodynamic properties which describe the state of a substance at the moment (ex:temperature and pressure, temperature and entropy). It doesn't depend on the path the substance followed to get there.

Sartaj Bal 1J
Posts: 101
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: state property

Postby Sartaj Bal 1J » Sat Jan 25, 2020 2:29 pm

Enthalpy is considered a state property because its value is determined by its current state. It is not dependent on the path taken to obtain that state. State properties can also be added and subtracted.


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