Water Phase Change

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Anish Natarajan 4G
Posts: 51
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Water Phase Change

Postby Anish Natarajan 4G » Sun Jan 26, 2020 8:09 pm

Can someone reiterate how water as a gas has more energy as water as a liquid when they are booth at 100 degrees C?

Maggie Eberhardt - 2H
Posts: 97
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Water Phase Change

Postby Maggie Eberhardt - 2H » Sun Jan 26, 2020 8:17 pm

I think gases have more energy because the molecules move faster and do not have a defined space they take up

Andrew F 2L
Posts: 103
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Water Phase Change

Postby Andrew F 2L » Sun Jan 26, 2020 8:17 pm

I think it is because gas particles have more room to move and there is more kinetic energy because the particles are hitting against each other due to the more space they have to work with

Aiden Metzner 2C
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: Water Phase Change

Postby Aiden Metzner 2C » Sun Jan 26, 2020 9:18 pm

It is because there is energy required to break bonds between water molecules. The hydrogen bonds in water are strong so it takes a lot of energy, therefore more energy is stored in gas at the same temperature than at liquid.

Joowon Seo 3A
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Water Phase Change

Postby Joowon Seo 3A » Sun Jan 26, 2020 10:29 pm

There needs to be energy required to break the hydrogen bonds in between the water molecules.

CalvinTNguyen2D
Posts: 102
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Water Phase Change

Postby CalvinTNguyen2D » Sun Jan 26, 2020 10:43 pm

Because the molecules of water are held together by hydrogen bonding, it takes a large amount of energy to break those bonds and change its phase; this energy is reflected in the gas phase with its high kinetic energy

205154661_Dis2J
Posts: 109
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

Re: Water Phase Change

Postby 205154661_Dis2J » Mon Jan 27, 2020 12:06 am

As mentioned above, the molecules of water are held together by hydrogen bonding; breaking those bonds require a great amount of energy.


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