Standard Enthalpy of Formation

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KarenaKaing_1D
Posts: 37
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Standard Enthalpy of Formation

Postby KarenaKaing_1D » Thu Jan 14, 2016 2:45 pm

Lavelle writes in his course reader that the standard enthalpy of formation of an element in its most stable form is zero. He also mentions later in the example that oxygen gas is in its most stable form. How do you know if an element is in its stable form or not?

Nikhil Davuluri 2A
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Standard Enthalpy of Formation

Postby Nikhil Davuluri 2A » Thu Jan 14, 2016 5:48 pm

For most elements, the most stable form is just a single atom. However, some elements are most stable in a diatomic for such as hydrogen, nitrogen, fluorine, oxygen, iodine, chlorine, bromine. I think you just have to memorize which elements are most stable in a diatomic form.

Here is a nice mnemonic I found on the internet

Have No Fear Of Ice Cold Beer

Hope this helps :)


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