Why does high molar heat capacity translate to high molar entropy?

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Henry_Shin_3B
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:55 pm

Why does high molar heat capacity translate to high molar entropy?

Postby Henry_Shin_3B » Thu Jan 26, 2017 9:20 pm

My current understanding is:

High molar heat capacity means that a bunch of heat is supplied for only a small temperature change. And therefore for any given amount of temperature change the heat supplied will be very high.

Since high heat would mean that the molecules would gain thermal disorder and become more disorganized, molar entropy would increase.


The flaw in my own explanation is that high heat doesn't necessarily mean high temperature (as I described in what it means to have a high molar heat capacity), and entropy increases with temperature. Does this mean that high molar heat capacity actually doesn't mean high molar entropy and I was totally misinformed, or is there some other explanation?

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Re: Why does high molar heat capacity translate to high molar entropy?

Postby Chem_Mod » Mon Jan 30, 2017 11:38 pm

Look at the units of standard molar entropy (J/(mol K)) and molar heat capacity (also J/(mol K)). Although they have the same units, they are two constants that describes two different thing. molar heat capacity describes the amount of energy (J) required for 1 mole of that material to increase the temperature by 1 degree C. But standard molar entropy gives the amount disorder gained or lost (in J) as a change of?


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