Calorimeter + Heat Transfer

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Chloe Alviz 1E
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Calorimeter + Heat Transfer

Postby Chloe Alviz 1E » Sat Feb 01, 2020 2:45 pm

In the book, it states that the heat lost in an reaction is heat gained by the calorimeter (-q=qcal). Can someone explain why this is?

Catherine Daye 1L
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Calorimeter + Heat Transfer

Postby Catherine Daye 1L » Sat Feb 01, 2020 2:56 pm

When heat is lost (exothermic) there is a negative sign since q indicates heat gained. So when -q=q one thing loses heat and the other thing gains (+q) that heat lost.

Daniela Shatzki 2E
Posts: 53
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Calorimeter + Heat Transfer

Postby Daniela Shatzki 2E » Sat Feb 01, 2020 2:58 pm

If a reaction occurs in a calorimeter and loses heat then that heat cannot go anywhere but stay in the system. Therefore, the calorimeter gains the heat lost by the reaction if that makes sense.

DLee_1L
Posts: 103
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Calorimeter + Heat Transfer

Postby DLee_1L » Sat Feb 01, 2020 3:10 pm

I think about it like a styrofoam cup being the calorimeter. If there is a chemical reaction within the styrofoam cup, then the styrofoam will absorb the heat from that reaction therefore, the amount of q absorbed by the calorimeter(styrofoam) is the q given off by the reaction.

Noe BM 1J
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Calorimeter + Heat Transfer

Postby Noe BM 1J » Sun Feb 02, 2020 3:50 pm

It might also be helpful to think that the heat of a system plus the heat of its surroundings has to be equal to 0. So, if you have an exothermic reaction that released -X amount of heat, the surroundings gained +X amount of heat in order for the addition of both to be 0.


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