Page 1 of 1

Heat Capacity for Calorimeters.

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 10:23 pm
by Daniel Yu 1E
When you are doing thermodynamic calculations with solutions in calorimeters, why doesn't the mass/mol matter sometimes?
I've seen in some equations you need to use mass/ moles but in others it is ignored. Why is that?

Re: Heat Capacity for Calorimeters.

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 10:58 pm
by Kaylee Sepulveda 4G
Heat capacity is a state function, but heat capacity is an intensive property. In contrast, specific heat capacity and molar heat capacity are extensive properties. Extensive means that it depends on the amount of material being affected, so mols or grams would be a factor in your calculations.

heat capacity.jpg
heat capacity.jpg (30.31 KiB) Viewed 109 times


Here is a nice explanation of a bomb calorimeter calculation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zEaMi5ob5Ig

Re: Heat Capacity for Calorimeters.

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:03 pm
by PranaviKolla2B
What is the difference between a calorimeter and a bomb calorimeter?

Re: Heat Capacity for Calorimeters.

Posted: Tue Feb 18, 2020 4:44 pm
by BCaballero_4F
PranaviKolla2B wrote:What is the difference between a calorimeter and a bomb calorimeter?

I believe a calorimeter is just a thermally insulated container while a bomb calorimeter is a sealed container that is metal in water which is also in an insulated container.

Re: Heat Capacity for Calorimeters.

Posted: Tue Feb 18, 2020 4:47 pm
by Aman Sankineni 2L
The difference between the two is that a regular calorimeter is simply a "thermally insulated container" while in a bomb calorimeter, the reaction takes place in a sealed metal container that is immersed in water in an insulated container.