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Conversions

Posted: Sat Jun 25, 2016 9:20 am
by Angelica Gomez 1A
What would I multiply "kJ" by to convert it into "J"? Would it be 1000?

Re: Conversions

Posted: Sat Jun 25, 2016 10:29 am
by YaraAlshwairikh
Yes. If you do the following dimensional analysis:

1 kJ * 1000 J/1kJ

the kJ will cancel out the other kJ and you will end up with J

Re: Conversions

Posted: Mon Sep 26, 2016 1:09 pm
by Shailyn_Moore_3C
Also for future reference k which is kilo is equivalent to 1000 of meters, liters, joules, etc. So kilo always equals 1000 of the base unit.

Re: Conversions

Posted: Thu Sep 29, 2016 2:01 pm
by Ryan Clydesdale
do we have to memorize the conversion of Electron-volts to Joules for tests and/or quizzes?

Re: Conversions

Posted: Fri Sep 30, 2016 8:50 pm
by Skolli20
I dont think we need to memorize such values but I would know how to do it.

Re: Conversions

Posted: Sun Oct 02, 2016 3:33 pm
by Courteney Hedicke 3J
Do we get a formula sheet with conversions between things like electron volts and joules and. other conversions that we might need to know? Or are these things we should be memorizing?

Re: Conversions

Posted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 7:45 pm
by Madeline Fox 2B
What is the conversion from Kev to J?

Re: Conversions  [ENDORSED]

Posted: Mon Oct 03, 2016 8:22 pm
by Myra_Zhan_2N
Madeline Fox 1J wrote:What is the conversion from Kev to J?


1 eV= 1.602 * 10^-19 Joules
1000 eV= 1 KeV

Hope this helps~

Re: Conversions

Posted: Fri Oct 07, 2016 6:05 pm
by Julia Hwang 3G
This number is on the back of the periodic table from the Course Reader Store along with all the other constants so I would imagine that we don't need to memorize it.