Avogadro's Constant

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Aliya Roserie 3I
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Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:16 am

Avogadro's Constant

Postby Aliya Roserie 3I » Sun Oct 11, 2020 6:21 pm

Hi guys! I am a little confused on what the Avogadro constant represents and when best to use it? do we use it to help convert unit identification or something else?

Adam_ElSayed_3B
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Re: Avogadro's Constant

Postby Adam_ElSayed_3B » Sun Oct 11, 2020 6:29 pm

Avagadro's number represents 6.023 x 10^23, and is often used to calculate the number of particles in an element. It can be used to convert moles to number of things (particles, atoms, ect.) Other than that my knowledge of avagadro's number and its application in conversions is a little rusty hahaha.

Constance Newell
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Re: Avogadro's Constant

Postby Constance Newell » Sun Oct 11, 2020 6:34 pm

The previous response is correct. Avogadro's constant is literally a conversion for "things"... so literally, anything that hasn't already been defined.. hahaha ik its very vague but its a great constant to use if you're trying to convert from a measurement you've never used before

Ivan Chen 2H
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Re: Avogadro's Constant

Postby Ivan Chen 2H » Sun Oct 11, 2020 10:05 pm

Since atomic units are incredibly small and hard to measure, we use Avogadro's constant to convert them to moles, which are easier to physically measure

Charlie Russell 2L
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Re: Avogadro's Constant

Postby Charlie Russell 2L » Sun Oct 11, 2020 10:08 pm

I agree with the above responses.

One thing that could help is to research or watch a Youtube video on how Avogadro's number came to be. We did this in my highschool chemistry class and it definitely cleared things up!

Michelle Le 3C
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Re: Avogadro's Constant

Postby Michelle Le 3C » Sun Oct 11, 2020 11:43 pm

Since atoms/particles are quite small, Avogadro's Constant is able to help convert moles in number of particles/atoms!

Teti Omilana 1G
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Re: Avogadro's Constant

Postby Teti Omilana 1G » Sun Oct 11, 2020 11:47 pm

Here is a short video that helped me on how to use it in case you needed a visual! https://rb.gy/jfzyi9

Edward Castro
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Re: Avogadro's Constant

Postby Edward Castro » Sun Oct 11, 2020 11:48 pm

i agree with all the posts, Avogadros constant allows you to find an easier route in order to convert moles in atoms

Samudrala_Vaishnavi 3A
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Re: Avogadro's Constant

Postby Samudrala_Vaishnavi 3A » Tue Oct 13, 2020 8:15 am

Avogadro's number represents the number of atoms/formula units/molecules in a mole. So it can be denoted as 6.002 * 10^23 atoms/mole. You can use Avogadro's number to find the number of atoms of something in a mole form, essentially converting moles to atoms. Note: every element has the same number of atoms per mole so 1 mole of any element is equivalent to Avogadro's number.

Matlynn Giles 2E
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Re: Avogadro's Constant

Postby Matlynn Giles 2E » Tue Oct 13, 2020 9:08 am

In number 10 of the Week 1 HW, I know Avogadro's Constant is needed to complete the problem but I am unsure how. Is there a way for someone to show me how? Thank you!

Nadya Higgins 3F
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Re: Avogadro's Constant

Postby Nadya Higgins 3F » Tue Oct 13, 2020 10:45 am

705418914 wrote:In number 10 of the Week 1 HW, I know Avogadro's Constant is needed to complete the problem but I am unsure how. Is there a way for someone to show me how? Thank you!

I actually didn't use Avogadro's constant in number 10, but maybe there is a method where you need to since I had to search some things up.

The way I did number 10 was by using a bunch of conversion factors. First I took the given amount of 2 butanone (.25 mL for me) and I converted it to grams (it gave me d=.81 g in 1 mL in my case). Then I converted grams to mols by using the molar mass of the molecule. I used the molar ratio of 2 butanone to 3-methyl-3-hexanol which was 1 mole to 1 mole, and then finally converted 1 mol of 3-methyl-3-hexanol to grams by using its molar mass. That gave me a number in grams which I used as my theoretical yield, and then plugged in to find my percent yield.

But I realize now that we might not know their molar mass; I knew because I had notes back from high school chem where we coincidentally used 2-butanone, and then I searched up the molar mass for the other molecule since I thought we had to know it..so I feel like either there must be some other way with Avogadro's constant or there's a way to find the molar masses through the pictures.

Hailey Kang 2K
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Re: Avogadro's Constant

Postby Hailey Kang 2K » Tue Oct 13, 2020 11:08 am

Hi!

Avogadro's number (6.022e23) basically represents the number of "things" (molecules, atoms, compounds) per mole of a certain substance. The explanation from the textbook says, "exactly 12 g of carbon-12 corresponds to exactly 1 mol of carbon-12 atoms.", so essential there are 6.022e23 atoms in 1 mol of carbon-12. This can be used in a number of ways such as converting between the number of moles and the number of atoms in a certain amount of a compound.
Hope this helps!

Aliya Roserie 3I
Posts: 97
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Avogadro's Constant

Postby Aliya Roserie 3I » Sat Oct 24, 2020 3:48 pm

Thank you to everyone who answered my question. Your responses have been more than helpful to me. Thanks guys.


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