Double Headed Arrow

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Heather Lindsay 1H
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Double Headed Arrow

Postby Heather Lindsay 1H » Thu Feb 25, 2016 6:26 pm

How do we know to use a double headed arrow? When a bond breaks, are two electrons considered to be transferred?

Alan Chien 1J
Posts: 72
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Double Headed Arrow

Postby Alan Chien 1J » Thu Feb 25, 2016 6:32 pm

Yes. A double headed arrow represents 2 electrons moving. Generally, one headed arrows will appear only for the transfer of electrons form radicals.

004594950
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Double Headed Arrow

Postby 004594950 » Thu Feb 25, 2016 9:48 pm

An arrow shows the transfer of electrons. A double headed arrow shows that two electron is transferred and a one headed arrow means that one electron is transferred.

Gabriel Esmailian 1F
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2014 3:00 am

Re: Double Headed Arrow

Postby Gabriel Esmailian 1F » Fri Feb 26, 2016 1:16 pm

Heather Lindsay 1H wrote:How do we know to use a double headed arrow? When a bond breaks, are two electrons considered to be transferred?


Yes, for bond breaks two electrons are transferred and thus a double arrow is used.

Shaye Busse 3B
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Double Headed Arrow

Postby Shaye Busse 3B » Fri Feb 26, 2016 11:46 pm

Double-headed arrows are used to show the transfer of two electrons from one lace to another while a single-headed arrow is one. Generally, the only time a single-headed arrow will be used is when dealing with radicals. Double-headed arrows will be more common since they will result in the formation of more stable compounds.


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