Iso, Neo, and Tert

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Andrew Uesugi 3I
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm

Iso, Neo, and Tert

Postby Andrew Uesugi 3I » Wed Mar 08, 2017 6:52 pm

Can anybody explain to me what Iso, Neo, and Tert are in common names?

So Iso involves the connection of Carbon bonds? And also Neo and Tert. But what exactly makes them different to one another?

Palmquist_Sierra_2N
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:56 pm
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Re: Iso, Neo, and Tert

Postby Palmquist_Sierra_2N » Wed Mar 08, 2017 8:20 pm

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deantuazon2G
Posts: 13
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Re: Iso, Neo, and Tert

Postby deantuazon2G » Wed Mar 08, 2017 8:49 pm

Can someone explain when to use these?

204781248
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:55 pm

Re: Iso, Neo, and Tert

Postby 204781248 » Thu Mar 09, 2017 12:34 am

deantuazon2G wrote:Can someone explain when to use these?

So basically, we use these terms depending on the structure of the molecule. It is a type of systematic naming. The important thing to look at, in terms of structure, is how many carbons are directly attached or "branched off" from the one carbon of the alkyl group attached to the long chain. If the akyl group attached only has a direct chain to 1 carbon it is iso. So in the diagram, the isopropyl group shows only 1 carbon from the propyl attached to the long chain and THEN it branches off to include the other two carbons group.
If it is "tert" that means the carbon from the propyl group has its 3 other carbons DIRECTLY attached to it, not branched.

it's actually much easier to understand visually, here's a link to a khan academy video that helped me understand!

https://www.khanacademy.org/science/org ... t-prefixes


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