Two cycloalkanes attached to each other

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zricciardulli
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Two cycloalkanes attached to each other

Postby zricciardulli » Wed Mar 02, 2016 8:27 pm

One example in the book we werent asked to name but 2 cyclohexane were combined to one another. Apparently, its called biphenyl. Just want to confirm that we wouldnt be asked to name anything like that on the quiz/final

Chem_Mod
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Re: Two cycloalkanes attached to eachother

Postby Chem_Mod » Thu Mar 03, 2016 10:13 am

Biphenyl would be two benzene rings attached.

It is not in my lecture notes and we did not cover it. You would not be expected to know that.

Please note: I am very fair. Material covered in class and homework is what I cover and examine.

Chem 14B is a general chemistry (physical chemistry) course.
However I dedicate a good deal to a solid foundation in organic chemistry to prepare my students for Chem 14C.
Obviously we cannot cover everything. Any additional organic chemistry reading is encouraged as it will help you in Chem 14C, Chem 14CL, Chem 14D, etc. You will see biphenyl in these 100% organic chemistry classes.

Ask around, ask UAs, ask students who have taken the MCAT, DAT, etc.
They are so thankful to have taken my classes that prepared them so well. A lot of effort on my part and for students in my classes. But the effort pays off. You will have a strong foundation for Chem 14C, MCAT, etc.

Anna Wiese 2k
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Re: Two cycloalkanes attached to each other

Postby Anna Wiese 2k » Mon Mar 07, 2016 10:29 am

On the 2015 Winter final question 10 A. asks you to name all the functional groups present in Doxorubicin, Phenol is listed as a functional group. I was wondering if we should be responsible to identifying phenol and further more why in the answer key the OH attached to the benzene ring were tallied twice, both as phenol and as an alcohol?

Chem_Mod
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Re: Two cycloalkanes attached to each other

Postby Chem_Mod » Mon Mar 07, 2016 12:50 pm

The correct answer is phenol but since we did not cover phenols we also accepted alcohol. I'll mention this in class today.

danielashirazi_1L
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Re: Two cycloalkanes attached to each other

Postby danielashirazi_1L » Tue Mar 08, 2016 8:41 pm

Do we have to know spiroalkanes and bicycloalkanes for the exam?

carissa1F
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Re: Two cycloalkanes attached to each other

Postby carissa1F » Tue Mar 08, 2016 9:16 pm

On the final, will it be clarified in the question whether you want a line structure or a structure that can show the shape of the molecule?
For example, if it was a cyclohexane with a chair or boat conformation or whether you just want to see a regular line structure?

Chem_Mod
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Re: Two cycloalkanes attached to each other

Postby Chem_Mod » Tue Mar 08, 2016 9:19 pm

danielashirazi_1L wrote:Do we have to know spiroalkanes and bicycloalkanes for the exam?


They are not part of the Chem 14B Syllabus.

Chem_Mod
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Re: Two cycloalkanes attached to each other

Postby Chem_Mod » Tue Mar 08, 2016 9:22 pm

carissa1F wrote:On the final, will it be clarified in the question whether you want a line structure or a structure that can show the shape of the molecule?
For example, if it was a cyclohexane with a chair or boat conformation or whether you just want to see a regular line structure?

Question will be clear when asking for structure or conformation.

004569922
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Re: Two cycloalkanes attached to each other

Postby 004569922 » Fri Mar 11, 2016 2:07 am

If you're given a case in which there are two identical cycloalkanes attached to one another (if that's even possible), how would you distinguish the parent chain? Substituents?

204643191
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Re: Two cycloalkanes

Postby 204643191 » Sat Mar 12, 2016 8:22 am

On quiz 3, they asked us to draw the line structure of (C6H11)C(CH3)3, so I drew a cyclohexane with a tert-propyl attached to it. However, they wanted the systematic name so I wrote down (1,1-dimethylethyl)cyclohexane and I got marked wrong on the dimethylethyl part, specifically the ethyl part. What would be the correct name?

204643191
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Re: Two cycloalkanes attached to each other

Postby 204643191 » Sat Mar 12, 2016 8:49 am

What's the difference between using phenyl and benzyl when naming structures that have cyclohexanes connected to longer carbon chains(therefore making the cyclohexane the substituent).

Peter2715
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Re: Two cycloalkanes

Postby Peter2715 » Sat Mar 12, 2016 12:06 pm

204643191 wrote:On quiz 3, they asked us to draw the line structure of (C6H11)C(CH3)3, so I drew a cyclohexane with a tert-propyl attached to it. However, they wanted the systematic name so I wrote down (1,1-dimethylethyl)cyclohexane and I got marked wrong on the dimethylethyl part, specifically the ethyl part. What would be the correct name?


That structure would actually have a tert-butyl sticking off the cyclohexane not a tert-propyl.
You are right; The IUPAC name would be: (1,1-Dimethylethyl)cyclohexane so I do not see why you lost a point there.

Peter2715
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Re: Two cycloalkanes attached to each other

Postby Peter2715 » Sat Mar 12, 2016 12:14 pm

204643191 wrote:What's the difference between using phenyl and benzyl when naming structures that have cyclohexanes connected to longer carbon chains(therefore making the cyclohexane the substituent).


We won't be expected to use phenyl or benzyl; rather if you have a cyclic substituent like cyclohexane or cyclopropane, you would treat it using substituent naming adding a -yl : For example, a 7 long carbon chain with a cyclopropane attached to the third carbon would be called 3-cyclopropylheptane.


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