Having a cylcoalkane as a substituent

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Casey Collet 1I
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Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2014 2:02 pm

Having a cylcoalkane as a substituent

Postby Casey Collet 1I » Wed Mar 04, 2015 6:49 pm

For this structure found on page 24 of the Introduction to Organic Chemistry book, I'm having a hard time understanding why you name this structure the way you do. It says that cyclopropyl is the substituent that is attached to carbon atom number two of pentane, but if you consider that the second carbon atom, wouldn't that be a six carbon chain instead of a five carbon chain? And also, why is the methyl on the third carbon excluded from the name?
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FullSizeRender.jpg
This is the picture of the structure

Chem_Mod
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Re: Having a cylcoalkane as a substituent

Postby Chem_Mod » Wed Mar 04, 2015 10:27 pm

Hi, all three carbons in the cyclopropyl group are not considered as part of the main chain. So the main chain has 5 carbons with cyclopropyl attached to carbon 2.

martha-1I
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Re: Having a cylcoalkane as a substituent

Postby martha-1I » Wed Mar 04, 2015 10:53 pm

I attached a picture explaining why the structure is named the way it is.
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20150304_225028.jpg
Detailed explanation of naming

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Re: Having a cylcoalkane as a substituent

Postby Chem_Mod » Thu Mar 05, 2015 9:28 pm

Martha's numbering scheme of the parent carbon chain is correct.


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