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Naming: IUPAC & Common Naming

Posted: Sun Mar 05, 2017 11:56 pm
by Paul_Ajodha_2K
In Friday's lecture we covered a cycloalkane that had a substituent on its first carbon and we called this substituent Butyl. The longest carbon chain in that substituent, although, had only three carbons which would make it propyl. I understand that it is called butyl because of common naming but why is common naming used alongside IUPAC naming in this case?

Re: Naming: IUPAC & Common Naming

Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 12:17 pm
by Shadi_Keyvani_1D
According to the textbook, IUPAC naming and common naming can be combined when naming compounds.

Re: Naming: IUPAC & Common Naming

Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 1:12 pm
by Chem_Mod
I believe you're confusing 2 examples. On page 96 of the course reader, the cyclopentane has an isopropyl substituent but the cyclohexane has a tert-butyl substituent.