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sig figs in electronic transition problem

Posted: Thu Oct 13, 2016 7:29 pm
by Beata_Vayngortin_3L
If you are given a problem that tells you that an atom went through an electronic transition from two energy levels (for example n=3 to n=1 like in the practice quiz) but you are not given any more numerical information, how many sig figs do you use in your answer? is it one sig fig because the energy level has one sig fig or do you base your sig figs off of Planck's and Rydberg's constant?

Re: sig figs in electronic transition problem

Posted: Thu Oct 13, 2016 9:25 pm
by Jazmin 2C
Yes same question here! I'm thinking three sig. figs. is standard, but I'm not totally sure.

Re: sig figs in electronic transition problem

Posted: Sat Jul 01, 2017 9:35 pm
by derek1d
Same question, I get confused on which to pay attention to when putting significant figures in the final answer. From my understanding though, the significant figures you begin with is what should be present in your final answer. Again, I could be misunderstood. Does someone mind clarifying this?

Re: sig figs in electronic transition problem

Posted: Sun Jul 02, 2017 7:25 am
by Timothy Kao 1B
I also have the same question. Would we just have 2 dog figs in the decimals?

Re: sig figs in electronic transition problem

Posted: Sun Jul 02, 2017 12:13 pm
by 805070989
I have the same question and will we get points off if we are off on sig figs or round?

Re: sig figs in electronic transition problem

Posted: Sun Jul 02, 2017 1:33 pm
by Chem_Mod
Beata_Vayngortin_3L wrote:If you are given a problem that tells you that an atom went through an electronic transition from two energy levels (for example n=3 to n=1 like in the practice quiz) but you are not given any more numerical information, how many sig figs do you use in your answer? is it one sig fig because the energy level has one sig fig or do you base your sig figs off of Planck's and Rydberg's constant?


In this example sig fig are determined by the measured values of the constants.

Exact numbers such as n = 1, 2, do not play a role in sig fig.
If you multiply something by 4 in a calculation the answer does not have one sig fig ...