sig fig for avogadros number

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305115396
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

sig fig for avogadros number

Postby 305115396 » Wed Oct 03, 2018 4:05 pm

When converting moles to atoms, I usually just use 6.02*10^23. However the solutions manual uses 6.022*10^23 and so my answers do not match up exactly with the solutions manual. Should I always be using 6.022 instead of 6.02? Or does it depend on the problem and how many sig figs the problem provides?

Angela Grant 1D
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: sig fig for avogadros number

Postby Angela Grant 1D » Wed Oct 03, 2018 4:07 pm

Since the textbook uses 6.022*10^23, it would probably be better to use that value so your answers can be more precise and line up with the textbook answers. In addition, it is a constant value so its sig figs are not dependent on other components of the problem.

Shash Khemka 1K
Posts: 38
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: sig fig for avogadros number

Postby Shash Khemka 1K » Wed Oct 03, 2018 4:32 pm

Avogadro's number has a constant value of 6.022 x 10^23. Because Avogadro's number is constant, its significant numbers in any given problem would not change. You can use either 6.02 x 10^23 or 6.022 x 10^23 but, since the solutions manual uses 6.022 x 10^23, I think it would be better to use that value. Additionally, it provides you with a more accurate value. Hope this helps!

kimberlyrose1G
Posts: 44
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: sig fig for avogadros number

Postby kimberlyrose1G » Thu Oct 04, 2018 3:13 pm

Based on Professor Lavelle's lectures, he uses four significant figures (6.022 x 10^23) so I'd recommend doing the same to avoid any large errors upon completion of a problem and the answer key he's made


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