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Determining Sig Figs

Posted: Thu Oct 04, 2018 8:09 pm
by RandallNeeDis3K
I get confused on when to "obey" the sig figs given in a question, and when not to. I overheard someone saying if there's multiplication, then you use the sig figs given in the question? Can someone clarify this for me, thanks.

Re: Determining Sig Figs

Posted: Thu Oct 04, 2018 8:19 pm
by MichelleRamirez_2F
When you are multiplying you must use the smallest number of significant figures in your data to be the number of significant figures in your answer. For example, if you are multiplying 6.18165 x 3.56=22.0 your answer must only have 3 significant figures since that is the smallest number of significant figures that shows up in your original data(numbers).

Re: Determining Sig Figs

Posted: Thu Oct 04, 2018 8:22 pm
by MichelleRamirez_2F
You may also want to refer to Dr. Lavelle's "Math Assistance" section where he has two documents that goes over the use of significant figures thoroughly!

Re: Determining Sig Figs

Posted: Thu Oct 04, 2018 8:25 pm
by Becky Belisle 1A
I think it's best to use sig figs in all problems. When doing addition or subtraction, the number with the least digits after the decimal determines how many digits can be after the decimal. For Example: 1.82 + 2.1 = 3.9.

Re: Determining Sig Figs

Posted: Thu Oct 04, 2018 8:33 pm
by Tatum Keichline 2B
Sigfigs should always match the lowest significant number given in the problem. For example, if a problem has 3.2+4.88=?, your answer should be rounded to two sigfigs.

Re: Determining Sig Figs

Posted: Fri Oct 05, 2018 5:44 pm
by Jacqueline Duong 1H
When you are multiplying or dividing, the number of sig figs in your answer is determined by the number with the least amount of sig figs. However, when you are adding or subtracting, the number of decimal places in the answer is determined by the smallest number of decimal places in the problem.

Re: Determining Sig Figs

Posted: Fri Oct 05, 2018 5:55 pm
by Raj_Bains_2C
It is best to obey the rules of significant figures all the time to retain the accuracy of measurements. It might help you to review the basic rules of significant figures.
Examples: 5.48 x 6.2 = 34 8.2 x 0.6 = 5 9.01 x 2.333 = 21.0