Nucleophiles

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

RaquelLopez_1L
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Nucleophiles

Postby RaquelLopez_1L » Fri Feb 26, 2016 12:12 pm

When determining the strength of nucleophiles, does it depend on polarization or is there some other way of determing which nucleophile is stronger?

ConnieDo3I
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Nucleophiles

Postby ConnieDo3I » Fri Feb 26, 2016 2:02 pm

I think you can also count the number of lone pairs. The more lone pairs, the stronger the nucleophile (because it has more electrons).

Hope this helps!

Gabrielle Schwab 1G
Posts: 26
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Nucleophiles

Postby Gabrielle Schwab 1G » Fri Feb 26, 2016 3:12 pm

Yes I believe you look at the number of lone pairs when this number is different between two species. However, if they have the same number of lone pairs, then you would look at polarizability.

Leena Tran 2K
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Nucleophiles

Postby Leena Tran 2K » Fri Feb 26, 2016 3:57 pm

Nucleophilic strength decreases going across a period.
e.g. R3C- > R2N- >RO- > F-

It increases going down a group, due to the polarizability effect.
e.g. F- < Cl- < Br- < I-

SubparChemist
Posts: 27
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Nucleophiles

Postby SubparChemist » Sat Feb 27, 2016 2:13 pm

Do lone pairs take priority over relative position on periodic table?

For example, would an element with less polarizability still be more nucleophilic than an element one down its column if it had more lone pairs?

ConnieDo3I
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Nucleophiles

Postby ConnieDo3I » Sat Feb 27, 2016 5:52 pm

I think that elements in the same group (column) would have the same number of valence electrons and, therefore, the same number of lone pairs, if any.


Return to “*Electrophiles”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests