Electrophile/Nucleophile

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Daniel Hsiao_1L
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Electrophile/Nucleophile

Postby Daniel Hsiao_1L » Sat Mar 12, 2016 12:28 am

Besides just looking at if the overall molecule has a positive or negative charge, how can you tell when a molecule is an electrophile or nucleophile if it has no additional charges attached to it?

304621080
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Electrophile/Nucleophile

Postby 304621080 » Sat Mar 12, 2016 12:53 am

Another way to tell is by using delta negative and delta positives. For example, a hydrogen bromide molecule is a great example. Since bromine has a stronger electronegative pull on the atoms being shared it is delta negative making the hydrogen delta positive.

Daniel Hsiao_1L
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Electrophile/Nucleophile

Postby Daniel Hsiao_1L » Sat Mar 12, 2016 3:15 am

I see! Is that the only other method?
Is there a method that involves drawing the lewis diagram and checking for lone pairs of electrons of some sort?

Desiree Martin 2A
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Electrophile/Nucleophile

Postby Desiree Martin 2A » Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:47 pm

From my understanding, when identifying an atom as a nucleophile, an atom that donates an electron pair to a electrophile due to free electrons or a pi bond, we must pay attention to the electronegativity, therefore we can distinguish the delta negative atom from the delta positive atom. As mentioned earlier, this can be seen in the case of H-Br. H is delta positive while Br is delta negative. The delta negative atom is the nucleophile, while the delta positive atom is the electrophile because it accepts electrons in order to complete it's octet. This is how we can differentiate a nucleophile from an electrophile.


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