Polarization and nucleophile strength

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Nick_Kopooshian_3C
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 3:00 am

Polarization and nucleophile strength

Postby Nick_Kopooshian_3C » Tue Feb 28, 2017 11:17 pm

I know that the more polarizable species are, the stronger the nucleophile is, but I'm not too sure about the general trend of polarizability across the periodic table. Can someone please help me out?

Liam Giffin 2B
Posts: 34
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 3:00 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Polarization and nucleophile strength

Postby Liam Giffin 2B » Wed Mar 01, 2017 12:15 am

Larger atoms in the same group are more polarizable. For example Bromine is more polarizable than Fluorine, so Br- is a stronger nucleophile than F-. I'm pretty sure the trend isn't as definite as for some other things, but definitely the elements towards the bottom right of the period table are the most polarizable.

Vivian Nguyen 2A
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:58 pm

Re: Polarization and nucleophile strength

Postby Vivian Nguyen 2A » Thu Mar 02, 2017 9:37 pm

I think it'd be helpful to review the first couple of chapters from Chem14A to get a refresher on the polarizability of atom! Typically, atoms will larger atomic radii (those towards the bottom of the periodic table) have more loosely bonded electrons and therefore have electrons more readily available to be involved in a reaction.

Kathy Vu 3L
Posts: 24
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Polarization and nucleophile strength

Postby Kathy Vu 3L » Thu Mar 02, 2017 10:39 pm

The more polar a molecule, the more regions of electron density. Therefore, these regions of molecules act as a nucleophile.


Return to “*Nucleophiles”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests