E=R(1/n-1/n)?

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danielruiz1G
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

E=R(1/n-1/n)?

Postby danielruiz1G » Sun Apr 29, 2018 11:31 pm

I'm confused on how exactly Borh's equation is turned into E=R(1/n-1/n) when finding the difference in energy level?

Briana Lopez 4K
Posts: 44
Joined: Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:01 am

Re: E=R(1/n-1/n)?

Postby Briana Lopez 4K » Mon Apr 30, 2018 1:24 am

ΔE=Ef-Ei
En= -hR/n^2

ΔE= -hR/nf^2 - (-hR/ni^2)
ΔE= hR/ni^2 - hR/nf^2

V=R(1/ni^2 - 1/nf^2)
ΔE/h= R(1/ni^2 - 1/nf^2)
ΔE=hR(1/ni^2 - 1/nf^2)
ΔE=hR/ni^2 - hR/nf^2

Sonia Aronson 1B
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:01 am

Re: E=R(1/n-1/n)?

Postby Sonia Aronson 1B » Wed May 09, 2018 12:54 am

Are we supposed to use E= R(1/n-1/n) or E= hR/n^2 when finding the difference in energy levels?

madisonhanson1b
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Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

Re: E=R(1/n-1/n)?

Postby madisonhanson1b » Wed May 09, 2018 12:38 pm

When given two energy levels (n1,n2) or a beginning and ending energy state you can use the E=R(1/n-1/n). The other formula, E=-R(h/n^2) is used to find the energy of an electron in the nth state of a hydrogen atom specifically

KristinaNguyen_1A
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Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

Re: E=R(1/n-1/n)?

Postby KristinaNguyen_1A » Wed May 09, 2018 8:49 pm

I am not 100% sure, but I think the equation R(1/n^2-1/n^2) is used to find the frequency, where the first one is initial and the second one is final because when deriving it you would get a negative final plus a positive initial, therefore it can switch places to make it a little simpler. (This was in my notes from discussion)

hannahtweedy
Posts: 29
Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2017 3:00 am

Re: E=R(1/n-1/n)?

Postby hannahtweedy » Thu May 10, 2018 9:06 pm

E=R(1/n2^2-1/n1^2) is the equation to specifically find the change in energy. The E= -hR/n^2 is for one specific energy level

Kuldeep Gill 1H
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Re: E=R(1/n-1/n)?

Postby Kuldeep Gill 1H » Thu May 10, 2018 10:22 pm

The book says Frequency = R(1/n2^2-1/n1^2)

Jocelyn Fermin1J
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 3:01 am

Re: E=R(1/n-1/n)?

Postby Jocelyn Fermin1J » Fri May 11, 2018 10:47 am

If a problem states energy was emitted would the final answer be negative and if the problem asks energy was absorbed would the final answer be positive?


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