Hybrid Orbitals


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Matia Kim 1B
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

Hybrid Orbitals

Postby Matia Kim 1B » Sat May 26, 2018 6:39 pm

What is the difference between hybrid orbitals and regular (nonhybrid) orbitals?

Jasmine Emtage-1J
Posts: 24
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:02 am

Re: Hybrid Orbitals

Postby Jasmine Emtage-1J » Sun May 27, 2018 11:42 am

Regular orbitals fill up in the typical way, with each orbital half filling (taking on only one electron) before any of them fill completely (2 electrons total) and then filling the next orbital in the same manner (Hund's Rule). Hybrid orbitals combine so that all the valence electrons are available to make bonding pairs with another atom. For example, instead of Carbon entirely filling its 2s orbital and having 2 unpaired electrons in its 2p orbital, it combines (hybridizes) its 2s and 2p orbitals in order to have 4 unpaired electrons available for bonding.

ErinKim1I
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

Re: Hybrid Orbitals

Postby ErinKim1I » Sun May 27, 2018 12:41 pm

How do you know when hybridization is necessary/ takes place?

SamanthaGrohe1B
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

Re: Hybrid Orbitals

Postby SamanthaGrohe1B » Sun May 27, 2018 5:44 pm

Hybridization of orbitals is usually greatly favored as this phenomena has lower energy compared to their separate counterparts. Since molecules and compounds form with the goal of attaining the lowest energy state of the interacting elements, it makes since that such an event occurs.

EllenRenskoff-1C
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

Re: Hybrid Orbitals

Postby EllenRenskoff-1C » Wed May 30, 2018 3:12 pm

To my understanding hybridization is a rare process. Why would it be rare if it can make an atom exist at a lower energy state?


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