Avogadro's Number

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megan blatt 2B
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Avogadro's Number

Postby megan blatt 2B » Thu Oct 04, 2018 2:40 pm

When doing problems where they ask for the amount of molecules of an element or compound, do you still use avogadro's number to convert between molecules and moles or can it only be used for atoms?

JT Wechsler 2B
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby JT Wechsler 2B » Thu Oct 04, 2018 2:43 pm

You can use Avogadro's number to convert between molecules and moles.

Gillian Ward 1F
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Gillian Ward 1F » Thu Oct 04, 2018 2:45 pm

Yes, you use Avogadro's number :)

Eunice Lee 1A
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Joined: Wed Oct 03, 2018 12:16 am

Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Eunice Lee 1A » Thu Oct 04, 2018 5:08 pm

Avogadro's number isn't just limited to just atoms or molecules, but you can even describe 6.0221 x 10^23 cups as a mole of cups. Avogadro's number can be used for anything!

catzxwang
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby catzxwang » Fri Oct 05, 2018 12:25 pm

megan blatt 4A wrote:When doing problems where they ask for the amount of molecules of an element or compound, do you still use avogadro's number to convert between molecules and moles or can it only be used for atoms?


Yes! You would use Avogadro's number to find the number of molecules in a given amount of a compound if you know the number of moles of the compound. The number for Avogadro's number that our textbook uses is 6.0221 x 10^23. So for every mol of a compound, there are 6.0221 x 10^23 molecules. The concept of moles isn't just limited to atoms, it applies to molecules as well! Hope this helped!

Phil Timoteo 1K
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Phil Timoteo 1K » Fri Oct 05, 2018 12:53 pm

Yes you would use Avogrado's constant.

Aaron Ang 4H
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Aaron Ang 4H » Fri Oct 05, 2018 1:00 pm

you would use avagadro's number for both molecules and atoms

Kevin Arokiaraj 4E
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Joined: Wed Nov 15, 2017 3:03 am

Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Kevin Arokiaraj 4E » Sun Oct 07, 2018 5:53 pm

Yes, use Avogadro's Number (6.022x10^23) to convert between molecules and moles.

Lily Smith 4C
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Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Lily Smith 4C » Sun Oct 07, 2018 6:00 pm

What is the difference between a molecule and an atom?

Brice McKeown 3D
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Avogadro's Number

Postby Brice McKeown 3D » Sun Oct 07, 2018 6:19 pm

In regard to Lily Smith's question, an atom is the most basic unit of the element. A molecule is when different atoms are bonded together. For example, look at a water molecule. It is made up of hydrogen and oxygen atoms.


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