Boiling temperatures and hydrogen bonds

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405161024
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Boiling temperatures and hydrogen bonds

Postby 405161024 » Tue Nov 27, 2018 3:56 pm

Can someone explain why H2O has a higher melting and boiling temperature than H2S please? I get that it’s because of hudrogen bonds but wouldn’t H2S have the same hydrogen bonds as H2O has?

Kevin Tang 4L
Posts: 83
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Boiling temperatures and hydrogen bonds

Postby Kevin Tang 4L » Tue Nov 27, 2018 4:13 pm

Hydrogen bonds are bonds specifically between hydrogen and Nitrogen, Oxygen and Florine. This is because N, O, F have the highest electronegativity. This means that the partial charge is higher between Hydrogen and N,O,F. It is more polar than the bond between Hydrogen and Sulfur. Because it is less polar, the bonds between Sulfer and Hydrogen are more easily broken, hence the lower boiling temp.

Hope this helps and please correct me if I am wrong.
Thanks.

tierra parker 1J
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: Boiling temperatures and hydrogen bonds

Postby tierra parker 1J » Tue Nov 27, 2018 9:02 pm

H2S does not have hydrogen bonds because hydrogen bonding only occurs when a hydrogen bonds with oxygen, fluorine, and nitrogen. H2S has dipole-dipole because when you draw out the lewis structure you see it is polar. H20, on the other hand, has hydrogen bonds and since hydrogen bonds are the strongest bond it is hardest to break meaning higher boiling points.


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