kJ vs J


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Lauryn Shinno 2H
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

kJ vs J

Postby Lauryn Shinno 2H » Sun Feb 03, 2019 10:11 am

The textbook switches between giving the answer in kJ and J. Does it matter which one I use?

Sara Flynn 2C
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: kJ vs J

Postby Sara Flynn 2C » Sun Feb 03, 2019 10:26 am

It should not matter because KJ is just 1000 J, as long as you are using the proper units so that everything will cancel properly you should be good.

Alexa_Henrie_1I
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:03 am

Re: kJ vs J

Postby Alexa_Henrie_1I » Sun Feb 03, 2019 11:15 am

Lavelle said they are interchangeable so you could use either as long as the answer matches the units.

Ariel Cheng 2I
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: kJ vs J

Postby Ariel Cheng 2I » Sun Feb 03, 2019 11:25 am

Either should be fine as long as you are consistent in your calculations and make sure that everything matches up properly.

Hilda Sauceda 3C
Posts: 76
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: kJ vs J

Postby Hilda Sauceda 3C » Sun Feb 03, 2019 1:19 pm

1 kj = 1000j but you can use which ever

Arta Kasaeian 2C
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2019 8:22 am

Re: kJ vs J

Postby Arta Kasaeian 2C » Sun Feb 03, 2019 2:15 pm

I don't think it matters unless specifically requested in the problem. However it's important to take account of the constants given and needed to use as the R value may specifically require the use of J over kJ.

kimberlyrose1G
Posts: 44
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: kJ vs J

Postby kimberlyrose1G » Sun Feb 03, 2019 2:54 pm

I think it depends on your answer, for example, if the answer is a very large value of J, you should convert it to kJ. Or if the problem gives you what units to have your answer in, that's always what you should go with.

Mercan Bayazit 4E
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:20 am

Re: kJ vs J

Postby Mercan Bayazit 4E » Sun Feb 03, 2019 8:36 pm

You can use whichever as long as you make sure your conversion is correct (1kJ = 1000J).

Nicolle Fernandez 1E
Posts: 56
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: kJ vs J

Postby Nicolle Fernandez 1E » Mon Feb 04, 2019 11:08 am

Just make sure you do the conversion correctly as 1kJ = 1000J and whatever you put the answer in is fine

005115864
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: kJ vs J

Postby 005115864 » Mon Feb 04, 2019 11:14 am

Both are good, just be careful and pay attention to units because sometimes a constant will be given in joules instead of kj so then you have to convert to joules in order to cancel out.


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