n


Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Jenna Salas 2H
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:22 am

n

Postby Jenna Salas 2H » Tue Feb 26, 2019 9:29 pm

In the equation deltaG=-nFE^0, what is n?

Subhani Diu 1F
Posts: 16
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:20 am

Re: n

Postby Subhani Diu 1F » Tue Feb 26, 2019 9:45 pm

In lecture he said that n is based on the number of moles of electrons gained/lost in the redox reaction.

CaminaB_1D
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: n

Postby CaminaB_1D » Tue Feb 26, 2019 9:54 pm

If they just give you a balanced redox reaction, do you then just look back at the half reactions and balance the charges again to figure out what the difference in moles of electrons were to get your n?

Jennifer Su 2L
Posts: 47
Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2018 12:20 am

Re: n

Postby Jennifer Su 2L » Tue Feb 26, 2019 10:58 pm

Follow up question: is n supposed to be (moles of electrons in reactants)-(moles of electrons in products) or is it (moles of electrons in products)-(moles of electrons in reactants)?

Albert_Luu3K
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: n

Postby Albert_Luu3K » Wed Feb 27, 2019 5:07 am

What Subhani said above is correct. I would just write the balanced half reactions and combine them to see what the number of electrons that cancel out each other is. That is your n. Hope that helps!

Mikka Hoffman 1C
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am
Been upvoted: 2 times

Re: n

Postby Mikka Hoffman 1C » Wed Feb 27, 2019 10:26 am

n in this equation is the moles of electrons transferred in your balanced redox reaction

Sarah Fatkin 4I
Posts: 71
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: n

Postby Sarah Fatkin 4I » Wed Feb 27, 2019 1:06 pm

"n" is the number of electrons transferred in a balanced redox reaction. For example, in the reduction of Ce4+ to Ce3+ with I-, there are 2 electrons being transferred, so n = 2.

Arta Kasaeian 2C
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2019 8:22 am

Re: n

Postby Arta Kasaeian 2C » Wed Feb 27, 2019 3:39 pm

n is the number of electrons transferred, to find it you would find the two half reactions, and balance them out for an equal #e. for example if cathode reaction has 2e transfer and anode reaction has 3e transfer, you would balance them for both of them to have a 6e transfer, in which case your n would be 6.

JiangJC Dis2K
Posts: 72
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2018 12:16 am

Re: n

Postby JiangJC Dis2K » Wed Feb 27, 2019 3:40 pm

n is the number of electrons involved in the equation. For example, if given a balanced redox reaction, you would have to reseperate the half reactions to find the number of electrons that are being cancelled out.


Return to “Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests