speed of reaction based on activation energy

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FrankieClarke2C
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

speed of reaction based on activation energy

Postby FrankieClarke2C » Thu Feb 28, 2019 5:07 am

If a reaction has a higher activation energy, does this mean that the reaction is slower?

Dimitri Speron 1C
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am
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Re: speed of reaction based on activation energy

Postby Dimitri Speron 1C » Thu Feb 28, 2019 5:27 am

Yes, generally. This is because the reaction will require a greater buildup of heat in order to reach the energy of its transition state.

fgalasso1b
Posts: 32
Joined: Wed Oct 03, 2018 12:15 am

Re: speed of reaction based on activation energy

Postby fgalasso1b » Thu Feb 28, 2019 12:50 pm

It is because since you need more energy to build up, the longer it takes to acquire the energy for the reaction to take place.

JT Wechsler 2B
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: speed of reaction based on activation energy

Postby JT Wechsler 2B » Thu Feb 28, 2019 1:12 pm

Typically this is the case. To have a reaction occur, you have to meet a set amount of energy (the activation energy) to have a reaction proceed. Typically the higher the activation energy is, the more energy will be needed to be put into the system.

mbaker4E
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: speed of reaction based on activation energy

Postby mbaker4E » Thu Feb 28, 2019 1:15 pm

Yes, because more energy is necessary in order for the reaction to move forward.

Lorena Zhang 4E
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: speed of reaction based on activation energy

Postby Lorena Zhang 4E » Fri Mar 01, 2019 9:26 am

Yes. To add on that, when adding catalyst, you increase the rate of reaction because the activation energy barrier is lowered so that the reaction can proceed faster.

Vanadium Wang 4H
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: speed of reaction based on activation energy

Postby Vanadium Wang 4H » Tue Mar 05, 2019 4:52 pm

Typically yes because the reaction will require a greater buildup of energy to overcome the activation barrier. Take a look at the Arrhenius Equation:
k = Ae^-(EA/RT)
A higher activation energy would result in a slower reaction.


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