Test 2


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Maggie Doan 1I
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Test 2

Postby Maggie Doan 1I » Tue Mar 12, 2019 11:28 pm

5. The ionic dissociation of water is given by the following reaction: The ΔH for the reaction is 58kJ/mol. The Kw for the reaction at 25°C is 10^-14. Is a pH of 7 acidic or basic at 30°C?
2H2O(l) H30+(aq) + OH-(aq)

What is the pH? I used the nerst equation but I'm not getting the right answer.

armintaheri
Posts: 68
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: Test 2

Postby armintaheri » Tue Mar 12, 2019 11:56 pm

You have to use the Van't Hoff equation:



Plug in values:



Solve for :





Since for a neutral solution :





Therefore, a neutral pH is 6.95 at 30°C. Since 7 is greater than 6.95, a pH of 7 is basic at 30°C.

Maggie Doan 1I
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: Test 2

Postby Maggie Doan 1I » Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:11 am

How is there 2pH?

Faith Fredlund 1H
Posts: 68
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Test 2

Postby Faith Fredlund 1H » Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:28 am

The above work shows 2pH because they are showing that in a neutral solution, pH=7 and pOH=7, so because they have the same value, you can take the equation

pH + pOH = 14

and substitute pH for the pOH and get,

pH + pH = 14 or 2pH = 14

Maggie Doan 1I
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: Test 2

Postby Maggie Doan 1I » Fri Mar 15, 2019 3:13 pm

So can we assume we always assume that when the pH is 7 then it will be pH + pH = 14 in which we will divide by 2.

Lynsea_Southwick_2K
Posts: 55
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Test 2

Postby Lynsea_Southwick_2K » Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:21 pm

How do you know that it is a neutral solution?


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